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Twelve Step Courses

The Purpose Of The Twelve Steps

Alcoholic Anonymous type of 12 steps and 12 traditions is one of the first therapy programs around and it is addressed as the standard for retrieval from basically any kind of dependence.


The finest method to beat dependence from alcohol is the 12 Steps which was shaped by the forefathers of Alcoholic Anonymous It gained its popularity from its early successful implementation in beating alcohol abuse that the drug rehab treatment adapted its own version of the 12-step program. Many nonbelievers have relied on the 12 Steps describing it very supportive despite the fact that it is strongly spiritual. The language use incorporated the term "God" in many ways, so that each group, each individual and each religious belief can interpret it in a way they will understand.


The 12 steps is also used by many other groups such as Debtors Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as different groups were formed to handle a variety of addiction problems.


Does The Programme Work

Due to the anonymous nature installed by the AA, and lack of provided information, it is difficult to know how effective the 12-step guide actually is. Experiences of former addicts who broke their addiction using the principles contained in the traditions is a proof that it works.

We do know that the 12 step model provides support, encouragement and liability for anyone that generally wants to quit their addiction. The regular meetings and communication within the community helps keep spirits high and take people away from relapsing.


Alcoholics Anonymous And The 12 Steps

Those applying the program can use different techniques as each person decides what will suit him because breaking free from addiction is a permanent struggle. Some of the steps discussed in the program are repeated severally by those using the program.

These are the Alcoholics Anonymous' 12 steps:

  • We now accept the fact that we cannot control our lives but depend on alcohol because we have no control over our reliance on alcohol.
  • Getting back to our senses depends on a power that is more than ours.
  • Taking a stand to turn to God for strength to overcome addiction and change the course of your life's direction.
  • Made a full and thorough inventory of our moral capability.
  • We open up to God, to ourselves and to other humans the errors of our ways and the wrongdoings we have done.
  • We humbly want God to help us eliminate our shortcomings.
  • We implore in all modesty before our God for the forgiveness of our mistakes.
  • Prepared a list of all those people we have hurt and willing to compensate them all.
  • Seek restoration of broken relationships caused by addiction without strings attached by checking out with the person first.
  • Self-evaluation is a continuous process on the road to recovery, and admit wrong.
  • We desire to have a better relationship with God according to our knowledge, and solicit for his assistance to understand him better and give us what we need to carry out what He plans for us through prayer and deliberation.
  • Having been the centre of a "spiritual awakening" we will carry on the message to alcoholics and continue to practice what we speak.

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The Twelve Traditions

While the steps are directed to the single person, the 12 Traditions are referred to the participants of Alcoholics Anonymous as a whole. These governing traditions are stipulated and defined in the Big Book as the official literature of Alcoholics Anonymous.

The 12 traditions are often applied to other retrieval plans by most 12-step groups.

We can help you find an AA group near you, so pick up the phone and call us today on 0800 246 1509.


The 12 traditions are listed below:

  • Individual recovery hinges on AA unity, leading to the organization's overall objective.
  • The ultimate authority of our group rests in one God and let it be manifested in our group's conscience.
  • The people at the helm of affairs of the group are not superior to others, they are there to serve us.
  • The readiness to quit alcoholic beverages is what a person needs to become a member of AA.
  • AA member group is independent and only share with other member groups matters of mutual concern.
  • AA group members primary mandate - is to share message of hope with alcoholics struggling to stay afloat.
  • Each AA group should never be strayed from our main goal which could be affected from money issues, possession, and fame and the AA name should not be associated to any external firm or facility.
  • AA groups should be able to support themselves individually, and decline any help from outside organisations.
  • While our activities may require having specialized professionals in our employment, the group itself does not lean towards professionals.
  • There may be committees or boards that will handle the affairs of members of their group while the group itself will not come together.
  • We should not share or have outside opinion on the problems of the outside world; we do not want the AA name being dragged into disrepute.
  • We base our relations policy on attraction over promotion, we should always keep our anonymity from the TV, radio, film and press.
  • Our principles come first before personalities, our anonymity lays the foundation of our traditions as a group.

Looking For Therapy

Do you want to overcome your dependence on alcohol and other drugs by using a proven 12-step program? You will discover the right program that suits you with more than 50,000 Alcoholics Anonymous groups spread all over the nation (and thousands of other Anonymous groups that work with different substance abuse).