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Alcoholics Anonymous Overview

Alcoholics Anonymous And How It Begun


Continuously providing help and support to alcoholic addicted persons for 80 years is what Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) does best. Alcoholics Anonymous was founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith both of whom were alcoholics, aiming to encourage others to quit and remain sober. The two came up with what is known as the 12 Steps to guide the meetings which later gave birth to the "12 traditions" that set out the reason for the AA's existence. The 12 Steps are still followed, and many recovered alcoholics say belonging to an AA group saw them through the recovery journey.


There are over 50,000 recovering alcoholics that are part of Alcoholics Anonymous group in the country and over 2 million around the globe.


What The Aa Meeting Entails

For first timers, getting the courage to go to an AA meeting may pose a challenge. The idea of going to a room full of people you don't know you are going through a problem and are seeking help can be intimidating. It is fortunate that every AA attendee understands your feelings exactly. AA was founded by recovering alcohol addicts and its model has remained till today. Everybody who is involved in AA activity has been its attendee before, which creates a unique feeling of solidarity and mutual understanding among the addicts.


The reception to the AA meeting is always amazing. New attendees are encouraged to join the discussion, but it is not required. Not everyone will be open to exposing their private experiences at first and everyone will understand this. During the meetings, the people present will openly discuss various issues about their lives and this helps many of them to find peace.


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What Are Closed And Open Meetings

A closed AA meeting is attended only by recovering alcoholic addicts or those seeking to know how to go about kicking the habit.

Partners, family and pals are allowed to attend open meetings. The beauty with AA is that they allow you to choose any meeting you wish to attend. A certain share of the people attending these meetings prefer to keep their therapy separated from the rest of their lives. These meetings can provide alcoholics the support needed by their loved ones and many are known to gain from this benefit.


12 Stages Of Recovery

The 12 steps were first started in Alcoholics Anonymous but is used in addiction recovery groups for many other drugs nowadays. It involves following one stage t the next throughout the whole recovery process. The member needs to be comfortable with every step before they can move to the next stage.

The first step includes admitting that you have a problem, and really need help to solve it. Admitting and accepting your mistakes, making an effort to correct these errors and deciding to always try and improve are some of the steps that follow. You can read more about the 12 steps here.


Objections To Aa

Withdrawal symptoms and other uncomfortable things one goes through as they try to quit alcohol abuse discourage many from attending the AA meetings. Most excuses people give include:

  • They don't see if they'll get the assistance they need
  • They are afraid of confronting someone they know
  • They haven't seen their alcoholism as a problem yet

These excuses may seem insurmountable, but the most important thing is to keep your eyes on what you want to achieve.

Accepting your condition and seeking help is the main objective. There will be no harm for you if you go to a meeting; besides, it can potentially save you from years of suffering caused by your addiction.


How To Find An Alcoholic Anonymous Group

Regardless of where you are living you will not have any difficulties in finding an AA group within the locality. It's easy to attend these meetings because the groups tend to meet up regularly. Make up your mind what kind of group you want to join, closed or open, then go through our online meeting finder to locate one near you. Let us provide you the help to find an AA group today please contact 0800 246 1509.